© everlark

Shout at my muse to see how they respond: 



#do et     ♡  16687
 
saltykun:

holy fuck

saltykun:

holy fuck



#me and chani    #me and ren     ♡  56525
 

CASUAL REMINDER THAT LATINA WOMEN ARE THE MOST UNDERPAID OUT OF BOTH GENDER AND RACE 

glitchprincen:

now imagine if they’re non-hetero, trans or disabled

REBLOG THIS



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delsinsfire:

so bioware apparently wants the DA:I players to never see sunlight again



#bye     ♡  19772
 
sweet-pea-soup:

crossing off one of 70 or so comic ideas I’ve been saving up over the past 5+ years

sweet-pea-soup:

crossing off one of 70 or so comic ideas I’ve been saving up over the past 5+ years



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fries-and-bowties:

The skeleton war is killing more.

fries-and-bowties:

The skeleton war is killing more.



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awesomemaple:

Because, how can you expect me to see this and not draw it?!

I’m not made out of rock, you know?



#my dad     ♡  9472
 

damnitoba:

religious homophobes think that as long as they’re polite about their hateful views it’s not gonna count as hate well it does and it literally kills people and you stay silent with that “I love you but I don’t support your lifestyle” you don’t fucking deserve the right to say you love us it’s a goddamn LIE



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elijahd0m:

Cykeem White & Alexander Dominguez



 ♡  27533
 

disney-rapunzel-merida-vanellope:

askkira-td:

raggedyasgardian:

I have been taking chemistry classes for the past few years, and I can tell you only one thing that Disney got wrong.

image

Put your hair up.

image

Put your hair up.

image

PUT YOUR HAIR UP, IT’S A HAZARD.

Maybe it’s to show how good she is.

Yeah
Shes too good for basic rules



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yourscientistfriend:

Ferguson vs Pumpkin fest  The media’s treatment of these two events were shameful!

yourscientistfriend:

Ferguson vs Pumpkin fest
The media’s treatment of these two events were shameful!



 ♡  16723
 

starkesthour:

when friends start shipping your OTP

image



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gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls



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